Mission Statement

Female scientists are currently underrepresented at the Faculty of Life Sciences, particularly in Biology. The Women in Biology Initiative seeks to understand the underlying causes and to support the careers of female scientists at all levels, from students to professors. Our vision is to equalize the female-male employment status and leadership at the Faculty. 

Upcoming events

  • Meet us at our next check-in meeting on Friday, February 3rd at 12:30. It will take place in person in the University Biology Building, 5th floor, meeting room 5.021 (next to the kitchen), and online on Zoom.
  • Meet Dr. Bea Maas in our next Role Model Seminar on Friday, January 20th at 12:00. It will take place in person in the University Biology Building, 5th floor, seminar room 5.1, and online on Zoom. More information about registration here.
  • For other events, you can also check our Events & Networking page. We look forward to seeing you!

News & Events

Event
 

Bea Maas

January 20th 2023 - 12:00-13:30

UBB, Seminar Room 5.1

News
 

Workshop "Appointment training for future professors"

March 29-31 2023, in presence

Organised by the Gender Equality and Diversity Unit at the University of Vienna

Registrations until February 19 2023

Awards
 

WoBio was one of the University of Vienna initiatives honoured with a national Diversitas award

Event
 

Erika Isono

December 20th 2022 - 10:00-11:30

UBB, Seminar Room 3.1

Event
 

Seminar "Balancing research and family"

December 13th 2022

10:30-12:00: Fusion talk – Science & EDI

13:00-14:30: Workshop – Parenthood in academia, challenges and solutions

Organised by...

News
 

Workshop "Habilitation – an academic ritual"

Registrations for the workshop "Habilitation – an academic ritual" are open

Status Quo

Our latest data show that female biology students clearly dominate. Still 50% of the graduating PhD students are females. Employments, however, dramatically decrease from postdoc to professor level. In 2017, among the full professors at our faculty, only 10% were female, whereas 90% were male.

Biology at University of Vienna (student data WS 2015/SS 2016; employment data March, 2017; absolute counts per category in brackets, gender proportion in percent)